The Sanctity Of Vision

There appears to be consensus among humankind that blindness is an objectively undesirable fate. I’d tend to agree, since while I live a full, satisfying life with blindness, it’s not a circumstance I’d necessarily have chosen for myself if someone had given me a say. I grew up in the shadow of pity, outdated ideas, and low expectations. More than once, strangers have insisted they’d be completely incapacitated if they lost their sight, even temporarily.
Not until adulthood did I comprehend society’s primal aversion to blindness. It goes beyond the ineffable fear of being disabled, straying into a territory governed more by bone-deep horror than reasonable discomfort. Of course most people wouldn’t welcome the thought of becoming disabled. Sight is a primary source for sensory input, so people’s instinctive panic when contemplating blindness, even as an abstract concept, falls within the lines of what I’d consider logical.
What I struggle to understand is the extent to which so many people, even medical professionals, avoid blindness at all costs. After a few people had expressed, to my face, the opinion that they’d rather resort to suicide than live without sight, I began to realize that vision and quality of life are inextricably linked in ways I, a person who has been visually impaired from birth, cannot possibly imagine. As it turns out, while I’m out there enjoying my life, people I pass on the street are thinking of me as someone who isn’t really living at all.
The idea shed its abstract quality when I met my dear friend Alicia. As an infant, Alicia had her eyes removed to save her from an aggressive cancer that, if left unchecked, is often fatal. Eye removal, while drastic, seems like the best possible choice—maybe the only choice—when confronted with the possibility of death, but not everyone saw it that way. Alicia’s journey through cancer and blindness has taught me that far more than the sanctity of life, the sanctity of vision is king.
This is her powerful story, in her own words. I hope you will read it, put aside primitive assumptions, and re-evaluate the way you perceive those of us who don’t have vision but who do have life, in all its richness.


Off and on while I was growing up, I heard the claim that society fears blindness even more than cancer. I think the first time I heard this phrase, it was based on some study that had been done–a national survey of some kind, but I was young enough at the time that I didn’t inquire into insignificant details such as sources or methodologies. My youth was only part of the reason I disregarded the information, though. Just as strong was the fact that I found this statement unbelievable. How could people fear blindness, something which can be lived with, over cancer, something that can so easily take one’s life away? Impossible…Or so I thought.
My rude awakening has come in various forms over the years. The first incident occurred in 2002. I had been considering having a tubal ligation, because I already knew I did not want children. I certainly did not want to pass retinoblastoma, the cancer I was born with, on to a child. At an appointment with my ocularist, he told me about a baby undergoing treatment for this same cancer. The doctors knew that the amounts of radiation being given were likely causing brain damage to this child, but both they and the parents refused to consider the option of removing the child’s eyes. Risking brain damage, not to mention leaving cancer in an infant’s body, all because the doctors and parents feared blindness so much? I was devastated. I cried for several hours, and made up my mind that very day that I would have my tubes tied as soon as possible. There was no way I was having any child of mine treated in a medical system that valued vision over life itself. I don’t think I realized until that day the tremendous service my parents had done for me in making the choice they did to have both of my eyes removed as an infant rather than leave cancer in my body. My respect and gratitude to them for that choice increased by leaps and bounds that day. Only then did I learn that they had actually had to push my medical team to do this. I always thought it had been the recommended option, because it was the one that made sense and posed the least risk to my life. Apparently it was not, and my parents had to lay down the law as my guardians for this to be done.
After my tubal ligation, this issue moved to the back of my mind until 2015, when I attended a mental health First Aid training session. The trainees were split into groups. Each group was given a list of traumatic events that a person might experience in life, and asked to rank them from least to most catastrophic. Two of the items on this list included being diagnosed with cancer, and vision loss. As the results came in, every single group ranked vision loss as the most catastrophic event a person could experience, with cancer diagnosis placed several items down the list. Once again I was shocked, especially given that many of the people in the room knew me personally. Did they truly not understand that blindness could be lived with, and lived with well? Did they really pity me that much, or believe my life was that terrible? I asked to address the room, and made my case for why I truly did not understand these rankings. I hope I gave people some food for thought, but I’ll never know for sure.
People’s tendency to value vision over life has come to my attention yet a third time in the last few weeks. A dear friend of mine has been diagnosed with a different kind of cancer of the eye, ocular melanoma. The tumor, which is particularly large, rests behind and within her eye. Thankfully it has not yet metastasized, but if it were to do so, the most common place for this particular cancer to spread is the liver. As most people know, short of Divine intervention, once it reaches that organ, a person’s days are numbered. The options for my friend were to radiate the tumor and attempt to save the eye, or to have both the eye and the cancer removed in one surgery, with follow-up appointments over the years to make sure she remains cancer-free. She spoke with two nationally renowned cancer hospitals, and got two very different opinions. One cancer hospital said they would outright refuse to remove the eye, considering this option medical malpractice. Again, I was shocked, though by this time, I don’t know why. It wasn’t like this information was new to me. Removing cancer from a person’s body is medical malpractice, but leaving it inside the body in order to keep an eye is not? The other cancer hospital was forthright with my friend regarding the risks and side effects of radiation, even though it has advanced in precision and effectiveness over the years. This hospital’s staff was honest about the fact that even with this option, there is only a 20 to 30 percent chance of saving the eye. After much thought and prayer, my friend felt her best option is to have the eye, and thus the cancer, removed. Sadly, she has had to push her medical team to accept her decision. At least she is an adult, and is able to advocate for herself and choose what should be done to her body. Children born with cancer do not have this choice, and must rely on the discretion of a medical community that tells people that blindness is a much worse fate than cancer and its treatment.
This philosophy continues to stagger and upset me today as much as it did when I first became aware of it 15 years ago. What is it about our society that makes people fear blindness over the potential loss of life? What can we as people who are blind do to change these perceptions? Is there, in fact, anything we can do? Will this philosophy ever change? These questions will likely remain unanswerable. For my part, I can only do what is within my sphere of influence. In the case of the friend mentioned above, my example has been part of what helped her realize that vision loss could in fact be lived with, and that she can and will adapt. If I can help one person know this, then perhaps my own experiences are not in vain. I just wish there were more I could do to show the medical community this truth. Do I wish blindness on a person? Absolutely not. There are days when it is extremely hard to deal with, when I curse the lack of accessibility, or the transportation issues it causes. There are days I am sad not to see colours, or pick up a print book and read it. However, at least I am alive to have these problems.
All things considered, I would much rather have life, with the inconveniences of blindness, than no life at all.

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Disability: The Gift That Keeps On Giving?

I was intrigued when I found out that Pope Francis planned to address disability. Historically, religious institutions have treated disabled people as angelic gifts from God, meant to represent innocence; living examples created to inspire love and compassion; or burdensome, cursed individuals who must be either healed immediately or cast out. Whichever viewpoint I analyze, it’s clear to me that none of these depictions of disability is accurate, and they are all potentially dangerous.

The “Cool Pope” disappointed me, however, when he placed himself firmly in the “gifts from God” camp. There goes progress, I thought. I’m not part of any religious institution anymore, but that has not limited my exposure to this ideology. Plenty of nonreligious people believe our disabilities are gifts—to the world, if not to us—which are meant to inspire goodness in other humans, and to foster special strength when fighting adversity. The idea, it seems, is that while disability is undoubtedly difficult and certainly not ideal, we’re given it for some mystical, predetermined reason, and our purpose in life is to function as a blessing to the world through our unique perspectives and commendable fortitude. People appear to subscribe to this belief whether they believe in a specific God, a nebulous higher power, or nothing at all.

You might think this is a refreshing change from the disability-is-universally-terrible myth, but it’s not much of a respite when you examine it closely enough. Once again, the ideology of disability perpetuated by able-bodied people dehumanizes us, placing us on either a higher or lower plain, depending on your perspective. Some would say higher, because we’re blessed with special powers of endurance, and what’s not flattering about being considered a “gift” to all the world? Some, like me, would consider the plain lower, because I find the viewpoint disturbingly backward. Disability is not written in the stars; or, at the very least, it is not usually inexplicable. People are disabled because of injury, disease, genetic disorders and so on, not because their destiny is to function as a living advertisement for the virtues of compassion. Believing that my disability was given to me for some mysterious purpose I am called to fulfill is a very heavy load to bear. My disability is neither a gift nor a curse; it just is. What I do with it is mine to decide.

I know it’s comforting to think of my blindness as something positive, and it does have its upsides (though I’d argue that I’d face plenty of hard times without it and could learn most of the same skills if I were sighted). This comfort is false and cold, though, especially since I’m not bettering the lives of others by default. Each time my blindness gets in my way—prevents me from finding employment, subjects me to discrimination, hinders me in all the ways it does—I don’t glow with purpose or rest in the knowledge that suffering is part of my destiny. What I do is get on with it.

As I’ve said many, many times now, I don’t spend my life feeling miserable or bitter. Genetics do what they do. That doesn’t give me or anyone else license to pretend that disability isn’t negative, though. I don’t subscribe to the concept of disability being some kind of transcendent experience or perk. It’s something I work around–largely because of the world’s attitudes and not because of my broken eyes themselves–but it’s not something I’m proud of.

So, next time you want to placate a disabled person—or the loved ones of disabled people—by insisting that disability is a divine gift, stop and think about what that might mean. Getting rid of this misconception is just one more way I can be thought of as fully human: flawed, but equal.